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William Wright
William Wright
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Hurricane season — Do you have your Hurricane Kits ready?

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With the new Hurricane activity forecast out from the good Dr. Gray, http://tropical.atmos.colostate.edu/Forecasts/2007/june2007/ it is time for eastern North Carolinians to prepare for hurricane season. Most people know or should know the necessity of preparing a hurricane kit complete with essentials (candles, water, can goods, fuel, first aid kit, weather radio, cash, etc…) to keep a household running in case of a loss of major utilities for an extended period of time. See e.g.http://www.nhc.noaa.gov/HAW2/english/prepare/supply_kit.shtml
What most folks, however, are not equipped to deal with is how best to handle the after effects of a destructive tropical storm or hurricane if their property is damaged (or God forbid) a family member is injured during the storm. This leads to what I believe is the necessity for another or second hurricane kit. This kit should consist of all important papers such as your homeowners insurance policies and information, health insurance policies and/or information, life insurance policies, bank account information, automobile insurance policies and information, boat owners’ insurance policies and information, copies of children’s birth certificates, identifications (i.e. driver’s license), special medical requirements, a property inventory, and important phone numbers and contact information. These items should be kept in a safe place (i.e. waterproof container) in your home and copies of the same may need to placed in a safety deposit box at a banking institution a safe distance from the coast, if you live in a flood prone area or and areas close to the beach or the intracoastal waterway. In my next blog entry we will discuss what to do in the unfortunate event that your property is damaged during a storm.